null
sidebar:
Get Paid For Answering RoboCalls?  Pros, Cons and My Opinion

Get Paid For Answering RoboCalls? Pros, Cons and My Opinion

Posted by Big Brand Wholesale.com on 12th Jan 2021

You may have heard about this new company offering to teach you how to GET PAID when those annoying pre-recorded messages make your phone ring off the hook. And, Cash For Robocalls is willing to share their secrets with you, but you have to give them $47 first. So before you jump into this new “money making opportunity” let me share a few things with you so you can decide if this is right for you:

The premise of this whole concept is that it is illegal to robocall people and harass them if they are on the National Do Not Call Registry. If a real company, like us, started robocalling our buyers, we could be held responsible and forced to pay every single buyer we harassed $500 PER CALL. So the premise of “Turn Robocalls into Cash!” is to catch REAL businesses violating USA Laws then force them to pay you for their sins. As someone who genuinely despises Robocalls, I am not at all against the idea. This whole way to “make money” sounds simple enough, right? Well…. Not really. Here’s why:

99% of LEGITIMATE COMPANIES IN THE USA DO NOT ROBOCALL. There are over 37 million companies in the United States; the vast majority of them are small businesses (over 99%!!).  I personally know small business owners all over the country and not a single one has ever robocalled or even considered it.  

HALF OF ALL ROBOCALLS ARE SPAM / SCAMMERS. This means when they’re calling you, claiming to be your credit card company, your auto warranty, the IRS, Microsoft, Verizon, Google, etc, they’re NOT actually these companies and they have no association whatsoever with these companies. They use special programs to “spoof” (change) the phone number so it matches your area code. They use IP blocking programs. They conceal their identity. Their goal is to TRICK YOU into answering because they are NOT a real business. Usually these robocalls come from outside of the USA. This means that the entire premise of “make the USA company who broke the law cough up $500” is super unlikely. I think the last time I got a Robocall from a real company was 2016 when a furniture store was doing a big sale. Every single call since that time has been utter scam-spam.

So I mentioned half of all calls are scams, but what are the rest? 2020 Data shows that 24% were “Alerts and Reminders”, 14% were “payment reminders” and 12% are telemarketers.

And finally, getting paid from RoboCalls requires work on your end. You have to:

  1. Answer the call (UGH)
  2. Sit through the Robocall and try to speak to someone
  3. Engage them in conversation and try to get their address, website, company name and other details (I’d rather get a tooth pulled than spend time chatting with a Robocaller)
  4. Next, IF the company is real, you have to print and mail (likely certified mail), a “Demand Letter”. The purpose of the letter is basically to say, “Pay me $500 or I am going to take you to court”. Your goal is to hope the company just writes you the check

POSSIBLE INSIGHT:

I guess your success (or failure) with this program really depends on WHO calls you; on my end it is all scammers so there isn’t a penny for me to get. Additionally, every time I do get tricked into answering the phone, the scammers put my number on a hundred more lists, so the scam calls triple. I am so burned out on it that I don’t even answer a call from a number I don’t know unless I suspect it to be a delivery driver.

HOWEVER, I would like to point out that I live in Michigan and according to USAToday.com, Maryland and Nevada got the most robocalls in 2020, with Colorado, Delaware, New Jersey, Arizona, Connecticut, Virginia, Georgia and Oregon also in the Top 10. Perhaps if you live in Georgia you will get robocalls from actual businesses?

IN CLOSING

I am not doubting that IF a REAL company, located inside the USA, Robocalls you, you stand a good chance of getting them to hand over $500 to you. People have indeed gotten paid. This isn’t a “scam” at all. From my point of view, this seems like a full time job that is filled with frustration. As a business owner, I run from Robocalls. Speaking of that; you ever wonder why every time you call a business there is always that message that says “Press 1 for Sales”, “Press 2 for Tech Support”, etc? Robocalls cannot get past the virtual assistant prompts - see, you learned something new today :)   BUT... I think you have a better opportunity using this same information to cash in on those horribly annoying text messages!